Capacity Building

TRAINING OVERVIEW

The RAISD training has been designed to build capacity of the staff working at the Action Research Units and committed to implement the Inclusion Strategies (TAIS) for selected vulnerable groups.

The training opportunities are intended to support inclusion actors to gain knowledge and skills on a wide range of topics that they might need in their path towards innovative attention and inclusion strategies, tailored upon the vulnerability context in which they operate.

The training includes session approaching Horizontal topics – which are more general issues of interest for all local ARUs, and Vertical topics related to the specific work of specific TAIS developments.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Through this course, trainees will:

  • Develop an advanced expertise to effectively analyse specific challenges and needs of the targeted vulnerable groups
  • Update their skills to implement suitable and evidence-based strategies to promote the involvement and inclusion of the vulnerable groups
  • Learn how to make their TAIS effective and the ARUs performing in a meaningful, responsible, long-lasting, sustainable and cooperative way, with constructive monitoring and evaluation of activities
  • Share experiences and productively discuss about positive solutions with both peers and experts
  • Improve the use of digital tools for virtual collaboration, participatory approach and inclusive communications

Training Modules

M1

Participatory Approach and Inclusive Communication skills

M2

Applying Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) Principles

M3

Adaptation to Covid-19: Creative Commons (CC), Open Educational Resources (OER) and Practical Online Teaching with Technology

M4

Gender Issues in the Mediterranean region

M5

Tailored Attention and Inclusion Strategies (TAIS) evaluation procedures

M6

Funding for projects on vulnerable groups

M1

Participatory Approach and Inclusive Communication skills

Expert: Federico Bussi, Consultant

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Learning Objectives

The basics of participation. The model of participatory decision-making process according to Sam Kaner (divergency-convergency). The most common and known methods for participatory events (Open Space Technology, World Café, Appreciative Inquiry, Lego Serious Play, Goal Oriented Project Planning, Technology of Participation ToP). The design of a participatory event. The role of the facilitator. The skills of the facilitator. Questions as a way to launch a significant dialogue. Active listening as a powerful tool for inclusion. Online participatory events: what changes? Suggestions and experiences.

Learning Outcomes

Participants get acquainted with the principles of participation. They understand the basis of a real and sustainable participatory decision-making process. They acquire knowledge on the most consolidated methods for running participatory events. They will be able to design tailored participatory events according to the objectives, number and type of participants, both online and in presence. They will be familiar with the role and skills of a facilitator. They will increase their personal capacity to have a significant dialogue in meetings and interviews.

 

M2

Applying Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) Principles

Expert: Anne Snick, Consultant

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Learning Objectives

Understanding the basic principles of RRI, and ability to apply the dimensions of RRI in a reflexive way to the TAIS test phases. RRI was developed in reaction to the growing gap between research agendas and practices on the one hand, and urgent societal needs, priorities and values on the other hand (R. von Schomberg). RRI therefore primarily requires a reflection on the mechanisms underlying this gap, and secondly proposes leverages for doing research in more responsive, responsible ways. Whereas many researchers treat RRI-principles merely as add-on to ‘normal’ R&I, reducing it to a box-ticking exercise, the aim of this training is to let participants understand the core ethical, ontological and epistemological ideas underlying RRI and to help them understand how these translate into the ‘visible’ dimensions of RRI. This will allow them to critically reflect on the way in which RRI principles are applicable in the RAISD project, and notably in the testing of the TAIS.

 

Core Principles of RRI

Current R&I institutions developed over the last centuries in an era when the planet within relatively stable geophysical parameters. This led scientists to believe that Nature functions like clockwork, and can be taken apart and controlled mechanistically; scientists believed they revealed ‘objective’ truths about nature and allowed society to use this knowledge for human progress. Underlying was the ethical view that mankind (subject) is separate from Nature (object), and that Nature is a resource for humans to own and use. Current crises (climate change, soil depletion, ocean acidification, biodiversity loss, mass migration, geopolitical tensions…) are recognised as ‘unintended’ or ‘unforeseen’ side-effects of this narrative; they are human-caused evolutions leading to the instability of the Anthropocene. These ‘anomalies’ (Th. Kuhn) give rise to the emergence of new paradigms in the Western world, based on more systemic (holistic) assumptions about the interdependence between humans and Nature. RRI is one way in which this new paradigm is taking shape. If humans (including their R&I-driven economies) are a strong force in the evolution of life and the health of ecosystems, they must act responsibly to preserve life. Since human societies co-create life on Earth, a scientific understanding of reality can only be achieved by actively engaging with societal actors in order to understand and govern the choices, values and practices that affect life on Earth. It is also recognized that the holistic and animistic knowledge/wisdom of indigenous people are a more accurate and sustainable account of human-nature relationships than the separatist, specialist approach dominant in the West. Including and valorising knowledge from actors that were traditionally excluded from R&I is therefore key to the survival of Life on Earth.

 

 

Learning Outcomes

Participants get acquainted with the principles of RRI. They understand how anomalies of the old paradigm require a thorough rethinking of how research and innovation are conceived of, in the light of the interdependence of humans and Nature. They understand how a more responsive/responsible paradigm necessarily impacts the social relations among those involved in R&I, and shifts who is included/excluded from research, how this affects gender relations, citizen engagement, governance, sharing versus commodification of knowledge, and other dimensions. They understand how this affects the educational process (unlearning traditional epistemologies and learning responsible ones). Once they have acquired a deep understanding of the core of RRI and the dimensions it translates into, they are able to reflect on the research process in the RAISD-project and clarify in what sense it embodies RRI. This will also allow them to plan, evaluate and iterate their TAIS test-sessions with an RRI-approach.

 

 

Structure of the training

In the first session (1,5 hrs) introduced to the basic principles and dimensions of RRI. This will be done as much as possible in a co-creative way, with plenary discussions interspersed with smaller group discussions in breakout rooms (per partner country, ideally).

During the second session (1,5 hrs) the participants use the acquired insights to highlight in what way the RAISD project reflects RRI-principles, and reflect on how to apply these in the TAIS testing.

 

M3

Adaptation to Covid-19: Creative Commons (CC), Open Educational Resources (OER) and Practical Online Teaching with Technology

Expert: Fawzi Baroud, Notre Dame University, Beirut

M3.1 – Creative Commons (CC)

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Learning Objectives

In this workshop, participants will:

  • Differentiate the concepts of open licensing, public domain, and all rights reserved copyrights
  • Understand the anatomy of CC licenses & licenses types
  • Distinguish between the different types of Creative Commons licenses
  • Find and properly attribute a work offered under a Creative Commons license
  • Experiment with using CC licenses, including proper attributions

Learning Outcomes

Participants will find out what Creative Commons is and how to use CC licenses. We will explore some useful tools for finding CC-licensed work and participants will practice working with CC content and how to apply different licenses to their own work. In this workshop you will learn both how you can freely share your intellectual property and use intellectual property that has been licensed with a Creative Commons license.

M3.2 – Open Educational Resouces (OER)

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Learning Objectives

  • Define OER and the 5 R’s of Open
  • Differentiate between OER / Open Textbooks / Open Courses / MOOCs
  • Have a clearer understanding of OERs potential in education
  • Learn how to Find, Evaluate, Adopt and Adapt OER
  • Experiment with a variety of platforms to access and share OER
  • Explore how mainstreaming OER can support in solving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and in particular SDG4

Learning Outcomes

Open Educational Resources (OER) have been shown to improve issues of affordability, access, and student success. The workshop will cover the fundamental aspects of OER with a focus on providing practical guidance in locating and using openly available resources.

M3.3 – Practical Online Teaching with Technology

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Learning Objectives

  • Learn about some fundamental methods to implement technology to improve the overall online teaching/learning experience.
  • Investigate existing online tools that can be used to support online teaching
  • Understand best practices for delivering effective instruction in a synchronous/asynchronous online environment
  • Discover Strategies and applications that encourage engagement and interactivity in online courses
  • Learn about techniques and best practices for facilitating online discussions

Learning Outcomes

This workshop provides two hours of professional learning to prepare participants for instructing in an online environment. Participants will explore the benefit of various online tools and applications available and how to successfully use them. We will cover strategies and tools to encourage engagement and interactivity, including techniques for facilitating online discussions.

M4

Gender Issues in the Mediterranean region

M4.1 – Gender Issues: Practical empowerment processes with groups of wome

Expert: Debora Angeli, COSPE onlus, Italy

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Learning Objectives

Often vulnerable women are treated and considered as persons to be assisted, persons without resources, without competencies and knowledge. It is true that often vulnerable women (migrants, refugees, others) are violated in their rights but the violation of their rights does not mean that these women are weak in terms of knowledge/competencies or do not have enough consciousness and proposals to be taken in consideration for a co-elaboration of possible solutions for their lives or for advocacy/lobbing actions to transform the social /political/cultural environment. 

Learning content

  • Gender and participatory approach: why to keep them together;
  • Instruments: women resource groups, public agendas of women, research-action in a gender perspective.
  • Some case study and 1 practical exercise

Learning Outcomes

In order to develop effective and reliable TAIS, all the field operators of the ARUs involved in the RAISD project should have a basic knowledge on gender and participatory approach and practical instruments for empowerment processes from a gender perspective of vulnerable women. Among them, it is important to better understand what means gender approach and how a gender approach is connected with a participatory approach to promote concrete and practical empowerment processes of groups of women.

During the training session, theoretical concepts will be reviewed and practical instruments will be analysed together with some practical examples.

M4.2 – Women trafficking and Interviewing techniques

Expert: Caterina Carmassi, COSPE onlus, Italy

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Learning Objectives

Often vulnerable women are treated and considered as persons to be assisted, persons without resources, without competencies and knowledge. It is true that often vulnerable women (migrants, refugees, others) are violated in their rights but the violation of their rights does not mean that these women are weak in terms of knowledge/competencies or do not have enough consciousness and proposals to be taken in consideration for a co-elaboration of possible solutions for their lives or for advocacy/lobbing actions to transform the social /political/cultural environment.

Learning content

  • Gender and participatory approach: why to keep them together;
  • Instruments: women resource groups, public agendas of women, research-action in a gender perspective.
  • Some case study and 1 practical exercise

Learning Outcomes

In order to develop effective and reliable TAIS, all the field operators of the ARUs involved in the RAISD project should have a basic knowledge on gender and participatory approach and practical instruments for empowerment processes from a gender perspective of vulnerable women. Among them, it is important to better understand what means gender approach and how a gender approach is connected with a participatory approach to promote concrete and practical empowerment processes of groups of women.

During the training session, theoretical concepts will be reviewed and practical instruments will be analysed together with some practical examples.

M4.3 – Discrimination and access to employment for female workers in North Africa

Expert: Ersilia Francesca, University L’Orientale di Napoli, Italy

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Learning Objectives

The basic of female labor market in North Africa – How patriarchal gender norms and paradigms influence women’s employment/unemployment – Workplace discrimination against women – Women’s unemployment rate – The role of microcredit in creating new opportunities for North African women.

Researchers and operators of the ARUs of RAISD project are to be trained in female labor force participation in North Africa in order to be able to discuss and decode the structure of female job market and the reasons why women are still facing a severe unemployment rate in the region.

Learning Outcomes

Participants get acquainted with the reasons why the gender gap has narrowed in North Africa in the field of education, while it remains almost unchanged in the economic arena. They understand the basis of female labor force participation and they will be able to find out the several difficulties women face in entering the job market. They will be familiar with the various strategies, which have been put in place to improve women’s participation in the labor market and to promote development, especially in rural areas They will increase their personal capacity to understand how microcredit and microfinance initiatives work.

M4.4 – LGBT rights in the MENA region

Expert: Marta Tarantino, University L’Orientale di Napoli, Italy

M4.5 – Empowerment in Morocco between gender politics, Islam and social movements: multiple actors, goals, discourses

Expert: Sara Borrillo, University L’Orientale di Napoli, Italy

M4.6 – Training on Gender Issues. LGBT rights in the MENA region

Expert: Deborah Scolart, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy

M4.7 – Training on Psychological Support and Trauma Management

Expert: Francesca Pidone

M5

Tailored Attention and Inclusion Strategies (TAIS) evaluation procedures

Expert: Antti Kivijärvi, University of Helsinki

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Learning Objectives

  • To understand the basic principles of realist evaluation and their interoperability with the RAISD project. Consequently, it is important to clarify the meaning of notions such as scientific realism, complexity, generative causation and mechanisms.
  • To learn to apply the principles of realist evaluation in practice. The RAISD evaluation framework will be presented in order to provide a concrete example on how realist evaluation can be conducted in real life settings. Moreover, while working in smaller sub-groups, realist evaluation methodology is applied in either to actual or imaginative FDP/refuge programs.

Learning Outcomes

In the RAISD-project, context-sensitive Tailored Attention and Inclusion Strategies (TAIS) are developed in order to alleviate the vulnerabilities of forcibly displaced persons (FDPs) living in different environments. To determine the feasibility of TAIS and to formulate evidence-based policy recommendations, an evaluation scheme is needed. In this training session, the evaluation framework of RAISD is deciphered both from the theoretical and practical perspectives.

M6

Funding for projects on vulnerable groups

Expert: Raniero Chelli, UNIMED, Italy

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Learning Objectives

Stakeholders involved in the ARUs of the RAISD project are often in need of additional financial resources to develop new project to the support their beneficiaries. In this brief seminar we will provide an overview of the most attractive funding instruments available, without pretending to be exhaustive: the goal is to present a number of relevant programmes with some concrete examples of real projects. This should trigger the interest in knowing more on how to access these programmes and how to monitor opportunities.

The following programmes will be presented, with examples of real projects and calls for proposals:

  • H2020 (→ Horizon Europe) 
  • Erasmus+ : Strategic partnerships 
  • Erasmus+ : Capacity Building for Higher Education 
  • AMIF 
  • Europeaid 
  • Union for the Mediterranean
  • Examples of local programmes

Learning Outcomes

Participants get acquainted with the main aspects of the said programmes. They understand the basis of participation in one of these programmes. They acquire knowledge on past, ongoing and future projects and how there can provide benefits to their constituencies. They will increase their personal capacity to identify suitable opportunities for start new funded projects and set up the necessary partnerships.